Category Archives: Elections

Dems Win with Historic Sweep in Fair Haven Council Election

It’s a first in decades, at least. A historically Republican-dominated governing body will change to an evenly split bi-partisan Fair Haven Borough Council dais in the New Year, according to the unofficial vote tally from the Monmouth County Board of Elections.

The team of Fair Haven-raised Democrats, Meghan Chrisner-Keefe and Mike McCue, have won the two seats up for grabs on council by a landslide, ousting 15-year Republican incumbent Jonathan Peters and his running mate GOP incumbent Jacqueline Rice, who was running for her first full term.

Continue reading Dems Win with Historic Sweep in Fair Haven Council Election

Elections: How The Governing Body Works in Fair Haven

As people go to the polls to vote in Fair Haven today, there are some facts about the borough governing body and its function and history that may have eluded many.

So, the notion in mind that an informed voter is a better voter, here are some facts that may enlighten and inspire at the polls:

Continue reading Elections: How The Governing Body Works in Fair Haven

Fair Haven Council Candidate’s Q&A: Meg Chrisner-Keefe

In Fair Haven’s Borough Council elections on Nov. 5, four are vying for two three-year seats on the six-seat dais: two incumbent Republicans and two Democrat challengers. Meghan Chrisner-Keefe is making her first run for public office as a Democrat candidate. Below is R-FH Retro’s Q&A with Chrisner-Keefe …

Democrat Fair Haven Borough Council candidate Meghan Chrisner-Keefe

Name, age, street address 

Meghan Chrisner-Keefe, 36 years old, 25 Beechwood Pl, Fair Haven.

Where did you grow up? What about your hometown do you think ultimately shaped your desire to serve the town in which you live? Any specific incident or experience? 

When I think about growing up in Fair Haven, I think about my lifelong friends and the places around town where we spent time together, our shared experiences and how it made me feel.

I want to serve the community that raised me and fostered my dearest memories and relationships which are the result of Fair Haven’s strong traditions and sense of community. I am grateful to raise my own children here and hope my grandchildren have the opportunity as well. 

What did you admire most about your hometown? Its greatest attribute?

Fair Haven has an incredible sense of community. It values its residents, both new and old, supports its children and fosters strong relationships. I am grateful that we can call our neighbors and friends an extension of our family and part of our village. 

How long have you been a Fair Haven resident? If there were periods in which you relocated, please explain why and where you lived? What prompted you to move to Fair Haven or come back, if that’s the case? 

My family moved to Fair Haven when I was 8 years old. After graduating from RFH, I spent four years at Syracuse University, followed by several years working in New York City. I lived in downtown Newark during my 1L year of law school and then moved to Red Bank. When my husband James and I were expecting our first child, we began looking for our first home in the area.

Moving to Fair Haven was the only option in my mind – I wanted my children to have the same experiences I had growing up. I met my lifelong friends in second grade at Knollwood when I moved here as a kid and we can now tell each other’s life stories.  

What do you consider the single most important issue facing Fair Haven residents? Please choose one issue only on which to focus. How do you propose it be remedied? Please be specific.

Taxes are on everyone’s mind. Every single decision of the governing body has a tax impact and component. While municipal taxes only account for 20 percent of everyone’s tax bill, it is critical that every cent in and every cent out reflects the collective desires of our residents.

Opening the budget and finance committee meetings to the public will engage more residents in the process and allow more collaboration on our town’s spending, particularly as it relates to bigger ticket expenses, as well as fixed and variable expenses. When we increase awareness of Fair Haven’s finances by making the public part of the process, there is an opportunity for improved understanding and appreciation of our property taxes. 

What is your professional career? What do you think is the most misunderstood perception of your line of work? How will your professional skills and make you a more effective public official? How does the particular misperception of your career that you cited make you better equipped to serve the public? 

I am a practicing attorney at Smith Eibeler in Holmdel. We primarily represent employees in both litigated and negotiated matters including unlawful termination, sexual harassment, discrimination and whistleblower cases.

If elected, my skillset will be particularly effective in advocating for our residents, analyzing complex legal issues, drafting ordinances and communicating with Fair Haven’s residents — things I do on a daily basis in my professional life. This skillset and perspective are not represented on the current council.

There’s a misperception that attorneys like to argue when in reality we’re simply advocating for our clients’ positions and trying to reach a resolution of the conflict. My ability to advocate, negotiate and craft settlements and solutions will be an asset to both representing residents’ needs and managing Fair Haven’s current litigations.

What do you think is the most misunderstood aspect of local municipal officials’ work and/or character? Why do you think that is? How would you propose changing that perception?

I believe the amount of time our municipal officials, both elected and appointed, spend taking care of Fair Haven is not well understood.

When borough business takes place behind closed doors or happens over calls, citizens cannot appreciate how much time they spend away from their jobs and families to do Fair Haven’s work.

If elected I will urge the council to engage in more public conversation on all agenda items, advocate for public meetings of boards, commissions and committees and commit to instituting streaming of borough meetings. 

Do you have any past experience on any governing body, local board or commission or committee? If not in Fair Haven, then where, in what capacity and for how long?

In law school I was part of a research team and served as a senior member of the team during my 3L year. Last year I worked with a small group of community members to raise funds for the new toddler playground at Fair Haven Fields. I am a current member of the Natural Area Committee, for which I served in a volunteer capacity for one year and have been a member of for the past year.

Cite a specific accomplishment in your life that has made you most proud — anything, from having an effect on one person or thing to initiating some sort of worldwide change. Why? How do you think this equipped you for public service? 

Attending and graduating law school has been an accomplishment that I return to daily as the reason many things have happened in my life. I never expected law school to be along my life path and I am proud of the not-for-profit clinics I participated in as a student, the research team I was a part of and that I am now a litigator advocating for my clients’ rights every day against small and large employers alike. If elected, my legal training and advocacy skills will be an asset to our council. 

Fair Haven Borough Council members are volunteer public servants. There is no pay or health benefits involved. It is also a very time-consuming job that requires transparency and accessibility to the public. What benefit is there for you, specifically, besides the obvious serving the town in which you live? 

I have a strong appreciation for democracy and believe there is opportunity for improved representation in Fair Haven. I’ve been speaking up at council meetings for some time now and decided it’s time to step up.

Time after time, despite attending meetings and asking questions, I was not afforded the information I sought. In the absence of transparency and accountability, democracy cannot function.

Enabling Fair Haven’s residents to have access to information, participate in the process and receive answers to questions are all goals of mine. If elected, the benefit for me is the benefit for all — restoring the trust of the governing body to one that is approachable, inclusive and communicative. 

In response to the contentious outcry from residents over a new business coming to town, a new business committee has been formed. The committee is designed to serve ONLY in an advisory capacity with respect to the community’s wishes involving incoming businesses. Do you think it will be effective? Why or why not? 

The governing body has appointed the Restaurant Committee to explore possible land use and zoning ordinances to replace the ones that resulted in the extensive hearings on the Dunkin’ application.

I believe the committee itself has already been and will continue to be effective in engaging in open and honest discussions and hearing Fair Haven’s citizens. I am hopeful that the governing body will honor its duty to embrace our representative form of government and strongly consider the committee’s recommendations once issued.

Affordable housing is another hot button issue in Fair Haven. The borough has not met its obligation. From a PURELY HYPOTHETICAL vantage, if you were given the ultimate power to satisfy the original need of 371 units deemed by the Fair Share Housing Committee, what sort of units would you propose bringing into the borough and where would you put them if the sufficient land were yours for the taking? 

Hypothetically, I would propose a variety of housing solutions to satisfy the need, including some typical units such as houses, condos and apartments, as well as creative housing solutions such as small scale housing solutions (think tiny houses), co-housing concepts and accessory structures (as was recommended in the 2016 Master Plan).

Again, hypothetically, a healthy mix of housing styles woven throughout our community would be an interesting approach to meet the varying needs and income levels of our community.

Which local municipal governing body member, in Fair Haven or the surrounding area (any town), do you admire most and why? Past or present. 

I’ve spent a lot of time attending borough meetings in the past few years. I am particularly impressed with Councilwoman Betsy Koch. I knew her from my days attending Knollwood and always felt she was an encouraging teacher and mentor for all students.

Now in her role as councilwoman, I see her advocacy for residents and appreciate her approach and effort to address needs and concerns. Councilwoman Koch’s energy and involvement is admirable and I am grateful for her continued commitment and work in Fair Haven.

All candidates expressed at the debate a desire to keep seniors in Fair Haven. It is a dwindling population, due to the high cost to live in the borough. If you won the lottery and became a billionaire, what would you do, personally, to help your senior neighbors live their lives out in Fair Haven? 

There are many tools and programs already available to reduce, limit or freeze eligible seniors’ taxes and Fair Haven should examine programs that would help our seniors remain in Fair Haven — we can do this and help our senior neighbors NOW.

If I became a billionaire, I would use the funds to establish a sustainable, well-researched program to support Fair Haven’s senior residents. 

Is there anything you would like to add that you feel is critical to your platform/candidacy? Please explain why. 

I’d like to thank all of our elected and appointed officials who work hard and generously volunteer their time and skills to our amazing town. I hope to earn your vote TOMORROW and have the opportunity to serve the Fair Haven community as an elected official.

Fair Haven Council Candidate’s Q&A: Jonathan Peters

In Fair Haven’s Borough Council elections on Nov. 5, four are vying for two three-year seats on the six-seat dais: two incumbent Republicans and two Democrat challengers. Jonathan Peters is a Republican incumbent candidate. He is currently Fair Haven Borough Council president. He has served on council for 15 years and is seeking a sixth three-year term. Below is R-FH Retro’s Q&A with Peters …

Republican incumbent Fair Haven Borough Council candidate Jonathan Peters

Name, age, street address 

Jonathan Peters, 56, 100 Park Avenue

Where did you grow up? What about your hometown do you think ultimately shaped your desire to serve the town in which you live? Any specific incident or experience? 

I grew up on the South Shore of Staten Island.  I was involved with recreational sailing and fishing from a very young age.  These experiences gave me a strong connection to the natural environment and the ocean.  That probably drew me to this community.  My desire to serve came from my father — who volunteered in our community — and who was a role model as to how one should help your community. 

What did you admire most about your hometown? Its greatest attribute?

A strong sense of community and family. Growing up on an island is much like living on the Rumson Peninsula, where we have strong geographic boundaries to our community and that helps us bond over common challenges.

How long have you been a Fair Haven resident? If there were periods in which you relocated, please explain why and where you lived? What prompted you to move to Fair Haven or come back, if that’s the case? 

My wife and I moved to Fair Haven in 1999 from Hunterdon County, New Jersey.  Being a waterman since I was a kid, I wanted to get back near the ocean and bays. The great schools, proximity to the water and my wife’s new job in Freehold motivated us look around the area. The walkable aspects and nice downtown attracted us to Fair Haven.

What do you consider the single most important issue facing Fair Haven residents? Please choose one issue only on which to focus. How do you propose it be remedied? Please be specific.

A continued focus on evolving the community to meet the needs of our residents.  The onslaught of online shopping options is changing the nature of downtown business districts.  As a community, we need to explore options as to how we can maintain a walkable and useful downtown commercial district for the benefit of our residents and businesses. As the government, we need to “set the table” — we need to manage the public infrastructure and business rules so that we encourage responsible private investment — an then we need to let the business owners do what they do best — provide goods and services.  

What is your professional career? What do you think is the most misunderstood perception of your line of work? How will your professional skills and make you a more effective public official? How does the particular misperception of your career that you cited make you better equipped to serve the public? 

I am a professor of economics and public finance at The City University of New York.  I think there is a perception that professors are somewhat detached from society.  I have not found that to be broadly the case, but I do think that it is unfortunate that more professors do not serve in public office.  

I believe that would help the professors understand society better as well as bring more cutting edge ideas to the public sector.  My training in economics and public policy have greatly aided my efforts in Fair Haven.  

My knowledge of public finance I believe has been very useful in helping the borough design the funding methods for our public facilities, be it fire engines, roads, parks, sports fields or open space.   Professors are very good a focusing on the long term — we do it all the time as we work on our research projects — which may take years or decades. I am very good at maintaining focus on the long game here in the Borough, and that is very helpful in solving major problems.

What do you think is the most misunderstood aspect of local municipal officials’ work and/or character? Why do you think that is? How would you propose changing that perception?

I think some members of the general public think that municipal officials can solve every problem that arises to their personal satisfaction. In many cases, problems may not have a consensus solution — where most townspeople agree on what is the right solution. That presents a challenge to an elected official, as we generally want to represent the views of our constituents. But it is not possible to represent all views if there is not complete consensus on an issue; and most issues do not have complete consensus from the residents.  

Talking about issues in an open way I think is the best way to help residents develop a sense of engagement and compromise as well as get the best ideas on the table.

Do you have any past experience on any governing body, local board or commission or committee? If not in Fair Haven, then where, in what capacity and for how long?

 Yes, I have served on Borough Council for the last 15 years. I am currently the Borough Council President.  My service on Borough Council has taken up most of my volunteering time over the last decade or so.

Cite a specific accomplishment in your life that has made you most proud — anything, from having an effect on one person or thing to initiating some sort of worldwide change. Why? How do you think this equipped you for public service? 

I have spent the bulk of my professional life as a university professor with a specialty in economics and public finance. I hope that I have been a role model for my students and that I have inspired them to be engaged members of their home communities.

I have had the great pleasure to see a good number of my students become productive business leaders, good citizens and parents, and that has been a great joy.

Serving on Borough Council here in Fair Haven offers me an opportunity to use my academic skills in a practical way, and to continue to learn and change based upon my service. Serving as an elected official has taught me a great deal about practical politics and working with people that has contributed to my research and teaching.

Fair Haven Borough Council members are volunteer public servants. There is no pay or health benefits involved. It is also a very time-consuming job that requires transparency and accessibility to the public. What benefit is there for you, specifically, besides the obvious serving the town in which you live? 

For me, I have a strong sense of duty and I believe that if I want to have the right to critique our systems, I have to be willing to serve in a policy role in our community.  I also think that this is the best way that I can serve.

As a professor of public finance, I like to put my professional training and theories into practice.  So far, the financial community has liked the performance of our financial controls, awarding Fair Haven a AA+ bond rating that we have maintained over the last 10 years —five rankings above the State of New Jersey that is ranked A-.

In response to the contentious outcry from residents over a new business coming to town, a new business committee has been formed. The committee is designed to serve ONLY in an advisory capacity with respect to the community’s wishes involving incoming businesses. Do you think it will be effective? Why or why not? 

I think it is key to have a good discussion of the issues that face the borough. The committee seems to me to be the best mechanism to gather opinions and ideas about this issue. 

The results will be shared with the Borough Council and the land use boards.  At that point, we need to see if any changes need to be made to the land use rules for Fair Haven. It is very important to understand that municipal land use ordinances can and do provide guidance to land owners, but they have limited scope as to what the private sector can do with the property that they own.

Affordable housing is another hot button issue in Fair Haven. The borough has not met its obligation. From a PURELY HYPOTHETICAL vantage, if you were given the ultimate power to satisfy the original need of 371 units deemed by the Fair Share Housing Committee, what sort of units would you propose bringing into the borough and where would you put them if the sufficient land were yours for the taking? 

Our current obligation looks to be two units — based upon our existing vacant land — so 371 units is a very big leap from a plan that reflects on the fully built out nature of our community. That being said, it has been hard to develop a plan in Fair Haven, as we have had a number of targets over the years set by the state agencies and the number of units needed varied widely. That made it hard to develop a firm plan that we could execute, as the scope of the units would impact how the plan should develop.

Best practices in this area (and I teach Urban Planning) generally tend to favor both mixed use facilities and transit accessible development, where you have housing over stores in a downtown and lower income housing along transit routes. This would make the River Road corridor our best potential site for low and moderate income housing. 

A second issue to consider is inclusive zoning, where the town gives a certain bonus in terms of housing units, typically 20 percent additional units, that are provided by a developer of a property and are mixed in with other market rate units. Those two solutions seem to me to be the most helpful in solving your hypothetical question.  

Which local municipal governing body member, in Fair Haven or the surrounding area (any town), do you admire most and why? Past or present. 

I have had the opportunity to work with a number of great people who served on Borough Council in Fair Haven. I value what each one has contributed to my understanding of politics, public policy and personalities.  

Some of my best lessons came from people who I did not admire – but they still taught me important lessons. It would be unfair for me to pick a favorite — I have served with so many.  I would say that one event that stands out is when Mayor Joe Szostak and the council members came together to lead a bipartisan group in building a better community after a very turbulent election. 

I was impressed by the bipartisan behavior on both sides during that time, and I continue to work to foster a sense of collegiality on the council between our members from both parties.  

All candidates expressed at the debate a desire to keep seniors in Fair Haven. It is a dwindling population, due to the high cost to live in the borough. If you won the lottery and became a billionaire, what would you do, personally, to help your senior neighbors live their lives out in Fair Haven? 

The key thing is to try to control costs and limit the increases in the tax bill for seniors. It is also critical to maintain support for critical services such as the Fair Haven Rescue Squad who provide important services for senior residents.   

A billion dollars would offer an individual a significant amount of money to donate annually to the community.  I would suggest that if we could provide a partial subsidy to property taxes for low and moderate income residents who have paid taxes in the town for 25+ years that might help a lot, and that is what I would probably do.

Is there anything you would like to add that you feel is critical to your platform/candidacy? Please explain why. 

I want to continue to serve the community. I think I still have a bunch of good ideas to move forward. I also am pretty good now at balancing our community goals with the financial realities of a town where 95 percent of the local government expenditures come from our local taxes and only 5 percent comes from the state.   

I have been a leader on shared services and privatization of public services in our community over the last decade. Fair Haven was recently ranked #21 in New Jersey Monthly’s Best Town’s report, and I hope that I have contributed along with many others to make our town one of the best in the state. I hope to continue to provide calm and thoughtful guidance to the community and borough staff that helps the borough continue to be a leading community in our region.   

Fair Haven Council Candidate’s Q&A: Jacquie Rice

In Fair Haven’s Borough Council elections on Nov. 5, four are vying for two three-year seats on the six-seat dais: two incumbent Republicans and two Democrat challengers. Jacquie Rice is a Republican incumbent candidate. She filled an unexpired term and is now running for a full term on council. Below is R-FH Retro’s Q&A with Rice …

Republican incumbent candidate for Fair Haven Borough Council Jacquie Rice

Name, age, street address

Jacquie Rice, 52, 45 Maple Avenue 

Where did you grow up? What about your hometown do you think ultimately shaped your desire to serve the town in which you live? Any specific incident or experience? 

 I grew up in Union Beach, NJ. When I was growing up I did not imagine that I would one day be very involved in my future town. The desire to volunteer and give back came much later in my life. 

I did have family members who volunteered though. My Uncle was a member of the Union Beach First Aid squad for all of my childhood. My Father coached grammar school basketball teams for Holy Family & St Joseph’s.

What did you admire most about your hometown? Its greatest attribute?

What I liked about Union Beach was that everyone seemed to know everyone. People who grew up there chose to stay and raise their families there also. 

I also like the fact that we were by the bay. I spent a great deal of my childhood exploring the marsh lands and crabbing in all of the creeks. 

How long have you been a Fair Haven resident? If there were periods in which you relocated, please explain why and where you lived? What prompted you to move to Fair Haven or come back, if that’s the case? 

 I moved to Fair Haven in 2005. I didn’t know anything about the town prior to meeting my husband. He grew up here as did his father. He was adamant that we were going to live in Fair Haven and raise a family here. As we started to have children I came to realize how unique this town is and what a great place it is for kids. 

What do you consider the single most important issue facing Fair Haven residents? Please choose one issue only on which to focus. How do you propose it be remedied? Please be specific.

 Our single greatest issue is deciding what to do with our facilities. Our Police Department must be replaced. Renovating it is not an option. Renovating was explored and it was deemed more costly than a complete rebuild. The community center is attached to the current PD so a decision needs to be made on where to rebuild that also. I would like to move the PD to River Road and get it out of the residential area it is in now and combine it with new Borough offices. Over the past year many options have been explored as far as property and where to move PD. Cost is a huge factor in deciding where to put the new building. I do not want to build anything that will cost the taxpayers money. Until the best location is decided and we can ensure a zero tax increase, we will not be making any decisions. 

What is your professional career? What do you think is the most misunderstood perception of your line of work? How will your professional skills and make you a more effective public official? How does the particular misperception of your career that you cited make you better equipped to serve the public? 

In 2006, when my son was born, I stopped working full time. Since then I have been a stay at home mom who has always had a part time job. I currently work part-time at Knollwood as a paraprofessional. For this question I would have to say that my professional career is being a mom. I think the greatest misperception about stay at home moms is that we don’t do anything worthwhile all day, are dissatisfied in life and gossip all of the time. This could not be further from the truth. 

I feel that being a mom full time helps me be more effective because I look at the issues from a different point of view. I want to make sure that Fair Haven remains a town where everyone wants to live so my kids will want to raise their future families here also. 

Knowing that people misperceive what a stay at home mom does has helped me develop thicker skin which is definitely a requirement when you are in a public role. It also drives me to prove the misconception wrong by working hard and making thoughtful decisions that are for the good of all of the residents.

What do you think is the most misunderstood aspect of local municipal officials’ work and/or character? Why do you think that is? How would you propose changing that perception?

 Lately I feel that a lot of people seem to think that municipal officials have ulterior motives. There is a baseless distrust of all levels of government. I honestly think this is because most people do not understand how government works.

There are circumstances where not everything being discussed amongst council can be made public. Those circumstances are clearly laid out by the state of NJ and strictly adhered.

It’s a shame because everyone at the municipal level is giving their time, away from their families, for free and there are some people who continually go around trying to disparage their reputations simply because they are ill-informed of how the process works. 

Do you have any past experience on any governing body, local board or commission or committee? If not in Fair Haven, then where, in what capacity and for how long?

 I spent one year on the board for the Junior League of Monmouth County. I was the recording secretary. In that role I learned a lot about leadership, decision making and basing decisions on the future of the organization. 

Cite a specific accomplishment in your life that has made you most proud — anything, from having an effect on one person or thing to initiating some sort of worldwide change. Why? How do you think this equipped you for public service? 

This may sound strange but I was proud of the fact that I went back to work downtown after 9/11. I didn’t enjoy going back to work. I was scared every single,solitary day but I did it.

I did it because the President asked me to … he asked that we all move forward with our lives and show the world we would not be broken. Continuing to work downtown I felt like I was part of the front lines of the war on terror so I got up every day, held my head high, buried my fear and moved forward. It wasn’t easy. 

I am better equipped today to deal head on with things or matters that I find frightening or uncomfortable. I feel that if I could survive that first year after 9/11, I can survive anything. 

Fair Haven Borough Council members are volunteer public servants. There is no pay or health benefits involved. It is also a very time-consuming job that requires transparency and accessibility to the public. What benefit is there for you, specifically, besides the obvious serving the town in which you live? 

The benefit I receive from serving is knowing that I am making a difference. I am making decisions to help move us into the future while maintaining our awesome community. I want to be a part of the solution not a part of the problem so I help make the decisions. I want to be impactful, I want to leave my mark on this world, serving the community helps me do just that. 

In response to the contentious outcry from residents over a new business coming to town, a new business committee has been formed. The committee is designed to serve ONLY in an advisory capacity with respect to the community’s wishes involving incoming businesses. Do you think it will be effective? Why or why not? 

I 100 percent think it will be effective. There was a lot of division in the town over a Dunkin Donuts application. I feel the committee allows for all members of the community to have their voices heard. The committee will advise council on how the cooperative public wishes to see the town move into the future. We all have a stake in the future of this town, I think the committee is a perfect example of how democracy works. 

Affordable housing is another hot button issue in Fair Haven. The borough has not met its obligation. From a PURELY HYPOTHETICAL vantage, if you were given the ultimate power to satisfy the original need of 371 units deemed by the Fair Share Housing Committee, what sort of units would you propose bringing into the borough and where would you put them if the sufficient land were yours for the taking? 

Hypothetically speaking I would have the town buy individual houses as they come onto the market, update them and sell them with a 20-30 year deed restriction allowing for low/moderate income families to purchase them. 

Which local municipal governing body member, in Fair Haven or the surrounding area (any town), do you admire most and why? Past or present. 

I admire Paul Smith,Jr. the current mayor of Union Beach. I do not know him personally nor have I met him. I admire him for his leadership during and after Super Storm Sandy.

My childhood home was flooded during that storm and my parents lived through a very trying time. Mayor Smith organized the recovery process immediately and communicated very clearly with the residents. His leadership helped pull that town back from the brink and the town is thriving today because of it. I can only hope that if I am ever faced with a crisis of that magnitude that I would be able to lead as he did. 

All candidates expressed at the debate a desire to keep seniors in Fair Haven. It is a dwindling population, due to the high cost to live in the borough. If you won the lottery and became a billionaire, what would you do, personally, to help your senior neighbors live their lives out in Fair Haven? 

First, I would use my money to hire professionals to meet with all of the seniors in town to help them apply for a freeze on their taxes with the state of NJ. 

For those who still couldn’t afford the taxes I would look into setting up a foundation that would assist seniors in paying the portion of their taxes that would be a hardship to them. 

Is there anything you would like to add that you feel is critical to your platform/candidacy? Please explain why. 

The only thing I would like to add is that this past year on council has been my honor and privilege to serve. I hope the residents of Fair Haven can see how passionate I am about this position and that they choose to vote for me again for a three year term. If elected, I promise to continue to serve the community to the best of my abilities. 

Fair Haven Council: The Candidates’ Debate

It was a first. A debate between Fair Haven Borough Council candidates. And it was last Wednesday night.

With two seats up for grabs and a host of controversial issues on the local government’s plate, two Fair Haven-raised Democrats running on a hometown “time for change” slate are challenging incumbent Republicans raised out of the area, but with a record of service to the borough, and running on an “experienced team” platform.

Continue reading Fair Haven Council: The Candidates’ Debate

Fair Haven Politics: A Civics FYI

As people go to the polls to vote in Fair Haven today, there are some facts about the borough governing body and its function and history that may have eluded many.

So, the notion in mind that an informed voter is a better voter, here are some facts that may enlighten and inspire at the polls:

Continue reading Fair Haven Politics: A Civics FYI

Fair Haven’s GOP Council Candidates: A Chat with Incumbent Betsy Koch

Elizabeth “Betsy” Koch
Photo/courtesy of Betsy Koch

In the race for the three seats that are up for grabs on Fair Haven Borough Council, six candidates are vying for the wins. Three are newcomer Democrats. Three are Republicans.

Of the Republicans, one is an incumbent, one a newcomer, and one a former councilman. The incumbent in the governing body race, Betsy Koch, who was appointed to fill the unexpired term of former Councilman Rowland Wilhelm, is on the ballot to fill a full three-year term.

Incumbent Betsy Koch, Elizabeth on the ballot, gave Rumson-Fair Haven Retrospect a glimpse into her background and political vision for Fair Haven in a Q&A chat … 

Continue reading Fair Haven’s GOP Council Candidates: A Chat with Incumbent Betsy Koch